Hyner

I have posted before about Hyner State Park which is about an hour from us. The previous discussion focused on work of the Civilian Conservation Corps and on the phenomenon called a Brocken spectre. What I offer today is a view from the overlook as it appeared this past Monday evening. Initially I thought that the bridge over the West Branch of the Susquehanna was a distraction. When viewing it now however I am of the opinion that there is synergy in the confluence of river, river valley, road, and setting sun. I also liked the way the bridge twisted through the countryside, mirroring the meanderings of the river.

Heinerfinishedsmall

25 thoughts on “Hyner

  1. Stopped by tonight to catch up on the blog and I discovered this most beautiful image from a location I consider to be one of the most visually pleasing in Pennsylvania. Through the wonders of technology, you’ve made a beautiful spot look more than beautiful. Thanks.

    • Thank you Ben for the kind words. Observations such as yours are what provide the motivation for continuing to work on this endeavor. I liked that image as well. It summarizes, for me, the way that view should be. Joanna and I spent two hours up there that evening waiting for just the right moment. Turns out that that moment occurred in the last five minutes we were there. Predictable. Thanks again for checking in and for the positive comment. D

    • Thanks. An thanks as well for the observations on camera sensors, eyes, and HDR. I’ve read the west and southwest are already pretty dry. Have you noticed any influence on your spring wildflower season? D

      • We’ve had below-averge rainfall this spring, and the lakes that provide water to Austin are only 40-something percent full. The spring has been atypically cool and breezy, so colonies of wildflowers (as opposed to individuals) got off to a slow start, but a few weeks ago they began putting in some good showings.

  2. This is an incredibly beautiful photo. I love the twisting ribbon of river and road intertwining through the unfolding landscape. What a wonderful place you live.

  3. You use the term “synergy” in a great way – I think I have never read “synergy” in a context different from management/PR lingo … such as “leveraging synergy effects after the merger” – that is, firing half the staff. Now you have eradicated my synergy trauma.

  4. Totally legitimate photography, no doubt in my mind 🙂 this is really beautiful. Regarding the use of HDR to enhance images beyond what our eyes would technically be able to see, I think that’s how photography goes from being a recording device to an art form. Anyone could have stood in that overlook and observed that sunset. But it takes a great artist to see extraordinary beauty in these ordinary scenes and transform them so that everyone else can see the beauty as well.

    • Yes .. right .. I’ll have to remember that. Thanks for coming up the just the right sequence of words to express how it is I feel about this issue. When you become certified as a hang glider bring your wings up here. Just about 10 feet from where I had my tripod set up there is a small wooden platform from which you may launch yourself into the valley below. We’ve seen folks fly off before … quite a site to see! Indeed! D

    • It’s not that our eyes can’t see a wide range of tonal values, but that our camera sensors can’t. For example, in this photograph [http://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com/2011/06/07/sneezeweed-flowers/] the sensor recorded the background as totally black while correctly capturing the brightly sunlit flower. I had no trouble seeing all the background details. Aesthetically speaking, I find it better not to see the details in the background because they would distract from my subject. Think of HDR as method for recording parts of the tonal range that the sensor couldn’t capture in one exposure.

  5. You brought it all together to create the image, ergo it is legitimate. You imagined the potential and captured it. Stunning!

    • Thanks very much Charlie. As I’ve already responded to another comment … this is an HDR (high dynamic range) image. Three exposures. One two stops under, one two stops over, and one right on – all sandwiched together. When you look at a bright sunset like this your iris closes a bit to protect the retina. When this happens your eye doesn’t let in enough light to allow you to see the details in the trees, for example. So it’s legitimate to ask whether this is a reasonable image. No human eye would be able to visualize the vista in just this way. But, because of both camera and computer magic one can create an image that couldn’t otherwise be visualized. What do you think? Legitimate photography or not? An interesting question, the answer to which I continue to think about. Unless one considers oneself a photojournalist (where realism is paramount) I think photography is mostly art – don’t you agree? I suppose I wonder about the point where photo manipulation transmogrifies what one sees through the viewfinder into something completely different. In the case of this particular image I believe I am safely on ‘this’ side of realism. I hope you agree. D

    • Thanks Ogee. Although blogging, for me, involves both words and images I’m especially grateful when folks are pleased with the latter. There are so many bloggers posting a range of beautiful images that I don’t often feel as though my efforts measure up. I’m glad to know you think that in this particular case the image gets a ‘thumbs up.’ D

  6. Wow! You should submit this one to the PA Dept of Tourism. What a gorgeous shot! Can’t believe that “real life” can be so beautiful!

    • Such praise. Thanks. This is one of those HDR (high dynamic range) images. Three shots. One under, one over, and one right on – sandwiched together. When you look at a bright sunset like this your iris closes a bit to protect the retina. When this happens your eye doesn’t let in enough light and you cannot see the details in the trees, for example. So it’s valid to ask whether this is a reasonable image? No human eye can see it, and this valley certainly didn’t look like this to me when I viewed it. But, because of camera and computer magic one can create an image that couldn’t otherwise be visualized. What do you think? Legitimate photography or not? D

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