GQ

The sheep have been out in their breeding groups for just over a month. Woodruff, below, has been assigned the largest group of girls and has been very busy. Siegfried, our younger ram, is out with far fewer ewes, and is doing his best. Shetland ewes are quite dainty while rams tend to be buff indeed. Shortly after shearing last spring I posted an image of Pairodox Henry. It’s not that I overly concern myself with expressions of appreciation received in response to these posts but I was surprised that Henry received a solitary like and two comments (both of which came from folks who raise sheep themselves). I tried not to take it personally and told myself that the lack of interest indicated that few bloggers were living in close proximity to animals (other than cat and dogs, of course) or, if they were, they simply didn’t have much of an appreciation of ovine form. Be this as it may I could not resist posting this image. You can see that our pastures are in very good shape. By this time last year we were already feeding hay because the pastures had long since dried and were in very poor condition. If this wet, mild, weather pattern keeps up we are likely to have open ground with plenty of green grass until Christmas. The longer we can hold onto the hay the more of a surplus we’ll have come spring. Hay in the loft is like money in the bank. The nights have been cold and I will be installing tank heaters in all of the water troughs this weekend. In another week or so we will separate the breeding groups. The rams will be separated, at some distance, from the ewes and the long wait for lambs will then begin.

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